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difficult issues that face the united states. so we are happy to have you. it's important to remember that yes, let's have quick applause for bob turner. [applause] do you know why? he may one day become a kingmaker himself. what we have to point out is acknowledging bob turner's election is that it requires for [inaudible conversations] across party lines. if you didn't know, bob turner is a republican in what would be otherwise considered a democratic district of brooklyn. mayor koch is not the first time -- and queens, you're right. so sorry. thank you for correcting me. but this is not the first time that mayor koch has crossed party lines. of course, remember, he voted for george bush in the second election, 2004. he actually famously said i don't agree with a single thing that george bush -- >> single domestic issue. >> with the exception of the fact that i think he is handling terrorism and a superior way. and that he was the most important issue. in the case of the movements, support for bob turner, you and i did an event shortly thereafter in which you explained your support
tack toy are -- brings out a jar and it's full of disdense that he -- we have that in the united states. and it's sort of different concepts it's not that a dictator disappeared people. but it is that violence and drugs really disappear huge segments of the black community and the bad choices. i began to meet these men and start to think about this. and ask myself, you you know what are their stories. but two, how about operating in a role which i can acknowledge my failures and their failures and respect them despite that. how do i deal with it? i think i deal with trauma. if you have an eye injury, you have eye forms scar tissue over the wound. i was playing soccer, you have to ask me about spanish. when i was playing soccer with latino kids. somebody can kicked the ball and it hit any the eye. my retina almost got detached. i had to see a specialist and it formed over it. it didn't get detached. then the scar formed over the scar. they thought it was at risk of breaking. it was at risk of being detached if i had experienced a huge blunt force trauma to my head. i won't tell you which
transformation of women writers or literary seekers from the rest of the world. as you know, united states of america, the land i love, the land i have adopted as my home, in recent decades has paid less and less attention to transiti transition, especially to literary translation. the number of books from the middle east and north africa into english -- [inaudible] in the last 32 years, there has been a lot more translation of english literature that there has been in america, from the land that many consider -- >> is there a contemporary woman rider and iran that you would recommend? olutely. let's first say that -- [inaudible] there is a renaissance. there is a renaissance going on in iran. and women are at center stage. let me give you one example about women novelists. in 1947, we have the first major collection of short stories by our foremost woman novelist can and she passed with a couple weeks ago at the age of 19. so women writers are very exceptional. women poets in iran go back over 1000 years, because poetry is more woman kind of art form. you can ride in the privacy of your h
. i would see a press corps, especially from the united states which had really not very much experience to draw on, most of that world war ii cohort, like ernie pyle, john hersey, edward r. murrow, martha kilbourne, a lot of these folks had very little experience as war correspondent. some of them had experience as a journalist, but very few of them had been covering world war i. and so for them it was all new. and i was really, really impressed with the quality and the beauty indeed of some the things they wrote. ernie pyle, you know, jimmy had always been kind of a cartoon character. you know, the journalist in the foxhole. but some of the things he wrote were choose, i would love to share. >> that would be great spent see if i can put my finger on it passage here that i think really evokes his finest work. and it was the kind of thing he wrote that cat people, let's see, in the service at that time. some of the soldiers would send letters back home to the family and say i'm not going to bother sending you any more letters. if you really want to know what the war is like yo
>> there is no the community in the united states of america the votes overwhelmingly 90% for one party. in 1996 i realized we voted republican. we only -- were the only race in the united states of america that is done. it's created a system that decided the republican party where republicans say we've got to win without them. so somebody starts with whether they are racist or not racist, people say stupid things in both parties. i used to get into that debate. i don't anymore. i'm just about trying to build people up, not tear people down. so that was a stupid discussion. do i think that is reflective of the whole party? now i don't. i don't publicly that. my point, i'm not trying to defend him. i don't come to these discussions trying to defend republicans nor do i come trying to defend democrats. i comes and here's what i believe and here's what i support. getting back to the point, if were able to look at some kind of model where we to 20% of the african-american committee and we said okay, you be a democrat, get engaged, go work on the hill, be a big fundraiser, to the polic
will see that we have a lot of other nations that in concert with the united states also believe that the unilateral imposition of the emissions trading scheme is inappropriate. finally, there appears to be some recognition on the european side of late that there are real consequences for doing this. so we will continue to press for the appropriate avenues for the resolution of an issue like this. we are continuing to make it clear that we have serious concerns and do not believe it should be implemented. and i think the consequences of the european union moving ahead to the latter are much better understood by the e.u. these days. >> mr. chairman, thank you. just a few comments, and i think it's worth noting, oftentimes we point out when there are mistakes made for cost overruns, but, you know, i just have to say that since i've been involved in nextgen, i mentioned in my opening remarks that there was a time when the faa could tell us in layman's terms what nextgen was. it wasn't until secretary lahood was appointed secretary of transportation, and randy babbitt, the former adm
in the united states, the role of human capital in promoting economic growth of a region and the impact of tax incentives on the creation of jobs in a region. so without further adieu, let me turn it over to paul. paul? >> thank you, steven. in preparing for these introductory remarks i wanted to conduct a scan of a research literature and get a sense what are the themes we can identify in the literature that can provide us framework for thinking about possible reform. interestingly i went through the same exercise larry did in preparation for his presentation. nice thing is i largely came up with the same findings, my comments, what i will try to do is fit my comments on the edges rather than repeat what larry said already. but as i said, i came up with three approaches that i thought were worth highlighting based on literature. the three we largely touched on already. the emphasis on sector focused training but generally getting employers more engaged in the training enterprise as a potential key to success. programs that are intensive, comprehensive or customized in providing training and s
to the united states, you had a whole bunch of training in that area, particularly from king holmes who's still in seat and still a real leader in stds. and then you go back to in 1983 to africa with some of the same people that you were in the ebola epidemic with. you're in that massive, i mean, anybody that's ever been in africa knows what i'm talking about, massive colonial hospital. and you say in the book -- you wrote in your diary: incredible, a catastrophe for africa. this is what i want to work on. it will change everything. what was so incredible? what would change everything? what were you looking at in that hospital? >> the hospital, by the way, is the name of mbutu's mother. dictators seem to really love their mother, and they have something, and they name all kinds of things after their mother. [laughter] no, i had been there in '36, gone through -- '76, gone think the files, and here -- gone through the files. and suddenly they were full with young men and women, in these todays of my age, and dying. emaciated and all kinds of infections, just name it. and we had, like, 100 cases
that this day has not been forgotten here on the floor of the united states senate. mr. cardin: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from maryland. mr. cardin: i want to thank senator gillibrand for bringing this moment to the attention of the united states senate and the american people and thank senator rubio, senator durbin for being here. it's hard to believe it's been 40 years. it's hard to believe it's been 40 years since that tragic event in which terrorists had the attention of the world in the olympics at munich. and it's hard to believe over the last 40 years we've experienced so much of the violence from extremists and terrorists, tomorrow we will commemorate the 11th anniversary of the attack on our own country, and we recognize that the only way that we can stand up to this type of extremism is to never forthe get. -- forget and dere-dedicate ourselves to do everything we can to root out extremists, to root out terrorists and to never forget the consequences of their actions. so i want thank senator gillibrand and senator rubio for the resolution that we passed in th
. mr. pietrusza, was coolidge a vain man? he was the only president of the united states to have his face on a u.s. coin during his presidency. >> guest: that is a true fact. that he is the only living president. it was a sesquicentennial of, you know, it was one of those things that, you know, washington and coolidge on the same thing. i'm not quite sure what role he had in picking that out. he did say it is a good thing for our presidents to know they are not great men or for people to know that. and i think he had a understanding of his limitations, certainly the limitations of power, federal power, presidential power, but also, you know, when he went out to the badlands and he'd put a head dress on he put a big cowboy outfit on. and, you know, one of his advisers said, mr. president, people are laughing at you. and he said, well, sometimes it's good for people to laugh. now, a guy who says that can't be all stuck up on himself. of course, he was also decided he wasn't going to run for another term. so being on the way out of office sometimes is a good thing. gls and if you would
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10